Indigo by Charlaine Harris

Indigo

Investigative reporter Nora Hesper spends her nights cloaked in shadows. As Indigo, she's become an urban myth, a brutal vigilante who can forge darkness into weapons and travel across the city by slipping from one patch of shadow to another. Her primary focus both as Nora and as Indigo has become a murderous criminal cult called the Children of Phonos. Children are being...

Title:Indigo
Author:
Rating:
ISBN:1250076781
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:352 pages

Indigo Reviews

  • Beth
    Apr 04, 2017

    What an amazing collaboration of some of my favorite authors! How did all these imaginations come together to compile such an original urban fantasy tale.

    I say urban fantasy and the retailer's buy links say anthology, mystery, suspense and thriller. I think all of those work except anthology, this is a collaboration but it is one singular story and not a collection of literary works as I assumed the term anthology implied. Now you see my excitement and surprise on how masterfully it was put tog

    What an amazing collaboration of some of my favorite authors! How did all these imaginations come together to compile such an original urban fantasy tale.

    I say urban fantasy and the retailer's buy links say anthology, mystery, suspense and thriller. I think all of those work except anthology, this is a collaboration but it is one singular story and not a collection of literary works as I assumed the term anthology implied. Now you see my excitement and surprise on how masterfully it was put together. Lets not forget the fantasy side. INDIGIO leans heavily on the occult and paranormal/magical side of things, so to me this is a really amazing urban fantasy read.

    I have to admit, I wasn't really sure where this was going and it did take awhile for me to find my invested in the story. But once invested, I was surprised and elated by the many twists and turns as well as the nail biting suspense that these authors have created.

    If you're a fan of any of these authors, if you love a great urban fantasy read, check out INDIGO.

    I received this ARC copy of

    from St. Martin's Press. This is my honest and voluntary review. This book is set for publication June 20, 2017.

    My Rating: 4 stars

    Written by: Charlaine Harris (Author), Christopher Golden (Author), Jonathan Maberry (Author), Kelley Armstrong (Author), Kat Richardson (Author), Seanan McGuire (Author), Tim Lebbon (Author), Cherie Priest (Author), James A. Moore (Author), Mark Morris (Author), Eva Diaz (Illustrator)

    Hardcover: 352 pages

    Publisher: St. Martin's Press

    Publication date: June 20, 2017

    ISBN-10: 1250076781

    ISBN-13: 978-1250076786

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  • Kate
    Jun 10, 2017

    Too many cooks spoil the broth, and too many authors shatter a storyline. I really wanted to like this book - Charlaine Harris is my girl - but it's going in my DNF pile at 65%. This is a collaboration of ten writers (ten!!) and every one of them has written about twelve pages of fight scenes. Seriously, it seems like every chapter starts with a fight scene, followed by another fight scene, followed by an internal fight scene with the demon, followed by a small progression in the plot. When the

    Too many cooks spoil the broth, and too many authors shatter a storyline. I really wanted to like this book - Charlaine Harris is my girl - but it's going in my DNF pile at 65%. This is a collaboration of ten writers (ten!!) and every one of them has written about twelve pages of fight scenes. Seriously, it seems like every chapter starts with a fight scene, followed by another fight scene, followed by an internal fight scene with the demon, followed by a small progression in the plot. When the plot does progress, it seems forced. Two stars because I could never give Charlaine a one. Perhaps I will eventually pick it back up to finish, but this point I have lost interest and I have a stack of summer novels waiting.

    Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  • Kathy Martin
    Jun 04, 2017

    Nora Hesper is an investigative reporter with a secret life. At night she turns into Indigo who can use shadows to disappear and to travel from place to place. She uses her talents to track down the Children of Phonos who are sacrificing children to bring back an ancient murder god.

    Nora is an interesting character whose past sounds like it came right out of the stories in superhero comic books. As events unfold, it becomes more an more apparent to Nora that the past she remembers isn't the past

    Nora Hesper is an investigative reporter with a secret life. At night she turns into Indigo who can use shadows to disappear and to travel from place to place. She uses her talents to track down the Children of Phonos who are sacrificing children to bring back an ancient murder god.

    Nora is an interesting character whose past sounds like it came right out of the stories in superhero comic books. As events unfold, it becomes more an more apparent to Nora that the past she remembers isn't the past she actually lived.

    The story was an exciting urban fantasy mystery. I couldn't tell that it was written by a bunch of authors because the story seemed to me to flow seamlessly from one exciting bit to another. I liked Nora's struggles to understand her past and her relationship with Indigo.

  • Carrie
    Jun 08, 2017

    By day Nora Hesper is a jounalist following the story of missing children that have turned up murdered in the community. By night however Nora becomes Indigo, a brutal vigilante that is taking on the murderous criminal cult called the Children of Phonos responsible for the children's deaths.

    Indigo has a darkness about her slipping from one shadow to another and forging the darkness into weapons to help her in her missions. Nora has memories of her parents deaths and traveling afterwords where s

    By day Nora Hesper is a jounalist following the story of missing children that have turned up murdered in the community. By night however Nora becomes Indigo, a brutal vigilante that is taking on the murderous criminal cult called the Children of Phonos responsible for the children's deaths.

    Indigo has a darkness about her slipping from one shadow to another and forging the darkness into weapons to help her in her missions. Nora has memories of her parents deaths and traveling afterwords where she studied meditation and strange magic in a monastery in Nepal after which Indigo became a part of her life. Now however Nora is questioning her memories and just where the darkness in Indigo was formed.

    Indigo is a collaboration between ten very well known authors, Charlaine Harris, Christopher Golden, Kelley Armstrong, Jonathan Maberry, Kat Richardson, Seanan McGuire, Tim Lebbon, Cherie Priest, James Moore, and Mark Morris. How, where, when and why these ten chose to write this story together I really didn't know but having read and enjoyed some of their books I had to pick this one up and check it out for myself.

    Not being a huge fan of a superhero type of story I was hoping that I would actually like this one despite the authors involved in creating it and I'm glad the story was one that while due to personal preferences I wouldn't quite give five stars too I still liked reading this one. I was expecting a vigilante/superhero story but Indigo's is a bit darker than that with a supernatural element added to it which I appreciated. In the end I'd give this one 3.5 stars and recommend it to those fans of the urban fantasy genre.

    I received an advance copy from the publisher via NetGalley.

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  • Heidi
    Jun 20, 2017

    DNF: Stopped at 50%/ Not rating

    You would think with an all star writing cast like this, that this book would be amazing. Sadly, trying to read a book written by numerous authors ended up being a disjointed messy read. 

    At first, I was intrigued and drawn into the story. The book starts with Nora, an average, investigative reporter who lives in a run down apartment with three cats she claims to hate. Nora is in the middle of investigating a rash of child murders. Then the reader is clued into Nora

    DNF: Stopped at 50%/ Not rating

    You would think with an all star writing cast like this, that this book would be amazing. Sadly, trying to read a book written by numerous authors ended up being a disjointed messy read. 

    At first, I was intrigued and drawn into the story. The book starts with Nora, an average, investigative reporter who lives in a run down apartment with three cats she claims to hate. Nora is in the middle of investigating a rash of child murders. Then the reader is clued into Nora's secret life. She has an alter ego, a super hero identity. She is also Indigo, a mysterious crime fighter, who is able to slip in and out of shadows unobserved. She wields the darkness like a cloak and a weapon. This was the cool part of the story. I loved the whole super hero/ alter ego identity, and I was intrigued by Indigo's powers. 

    However, the further I read, the more disjointed the story became. It isn't easy to pick up where the authors transition and the story is taken over by someone else, but the reader can pick up on the subtle differences. There were parts of the story where I was completely immersed and loving what I read, and then there were portions where it became jumbled, confusing and it didn't flow seamlessly. There were even some slight mistakes, i.e. Indigo swoops in and tries to save one of the kidnapped kids, only to get there too late, but then later in the story, there is a mention that she saved the kid, and further in, the child is dead again. Then there are other parts that don't fit. 

    I started disengaging because of the confusion and I didn't like that at times I was skimming, I am guessing it was because certain authors' writing styles appealed to me more than others. Again, there is no indication as to who is writing what part of the story. 

    I also didn't like the dark tone of the story, involved a cult who sacrificed children in ritualistic ceremonies to demons. Creepy and unsettling!

    I finally gave up around the half way mark because I was not paying attention to what I was reading, and I didn't like the disjointed and confusing feel to the story. Even though the story had a great premise, I think this is a case of too many cooks ruining the batter. 

    Perhaps others will find this a better fit. I was really hoping for something fantastic as I enjoy many of the authors books who are involved. Sadly, this experiment was a bit of a flop. 

    Hopefully, my next read will be better. Anyone else tackled this one? Thoughts?

  • Allen Adams
    Jun 22, 2017

    One tends to think of writers as solitary artists, constructing their stories in their imaginations and then laying them down on the page. Novels are the product of a singular vision.

    Except when they aren’t.

    The new book “Indigo” (St. Martin’s Press, $27.99) isn’t the product of just one writer. Nor of two or three. All told, there are 10 listed authors here – Kelly Armstrong, Christopher Golden, Charlaine Harris, Tim Lebbon, Jonathan Maberry, Seanan McGuir

    One tends to think of writers as solitary artists, constructing their stories in their imaginations and then laying them down on the page. Novels are the product of a singular vision.

    Except when they aren’t.

    The new book “Indigo” (St. Martin’s Press, $27.99) isn’t the product of just one writer. Nor of two or three. All told, there are 10 listed authors here – Kelly Armstrong, Christopher Golden, Charlaine Harris, Tim Lebbon, Jonathan Maberry, Seanan McGuire, James A. Moore, Mark Morris, Cherie Priest and Kat Richardson all had a hand in bringing this story to life.

    And it’s a pretty good story at that.

    Nora Hesper is an investigative reporter – one of the best in the city – on the trail of one of the biggest stories of her career. She’s on the verge of uncovering the truth behind a series of child abductions and murders.

    But she is also Indigo, a superpowered vigilante who uses her command of the shadows to track down and punish evildoers – specifically, the members of a cult devoted to calling forth and controlling the embodiment of Death itself.

    Striking the balance between her two lives isn’t easy; no one – not even her on-again off-again beau Sam or her upstairs neighbor and best friend Shelby – knows the truth about Nora and Indigo.

    But when the Cult of Phobos starts to grow active again, Nora/Indigo starts to realize that there are a whole lot of things about her own story that just don’t add up. When Nora was 19, her parents died in a tragic accident; she spent the insurance money traveling to Tibet, which is where she developed and studied her shadowy abilities. But why does she have a nagging feeling that something about that origin story is suspicious?

    As she pulls at the threads of memory, the holes Nora’s personal narrative fabric grow larger, leaving her questioning whether anything she once believed about herself is in fact the truth. And all the while, the Cult of Phobos grows stronger and the lives of many innocent children are at risk.

    Nora must come to terms with her alter ego; the longtime compartmentalization separating her and Indigo has to end if there’s any chance to defeat the many powerful enemies that seek to destroy not just her, but the entire world.

    As a literary endeavor, “Indigo” is fairly successful. One would think that having 10 authors would negatively impact the overall stylistic flow of the piece, but aside from occasional choppiness, it all seems to coalesce quite nicely. Massively collaborative efforts like this are tricky; they can come off as wildly uneven and/or gimmicky. But when they work, they’re great fun to experience – and “Indigo” works.

    The most familiar names of the bunch are probably Harris and Golden, but ultimately, it doesn’t really matter. In truth, the best compliment I can give a book like this is the fact that I never found myself wondering who wrote what while I was reading in the moment. I was engrossed in the story for its own sake. The clean lines, smart characterizations and sharp pacing of the narrative made sure of that. Instead, it was only afterward when my curiosity about the nuts and bolts of the thing bubbled to the surface.

    Now, it’s not smooth sailing the whole way. Every once in a while, a clunky stretch presents itself, a spot where maybe the connective tissue of the collaboration shows through. But those bits where the seams show are both rare and brief; it’s never long before the story pulls you in again.

    “Indigo” makes for an engaging read, an entertaining supernatural mystery. It’s breezy while still offering the odd moment of visceral intensity; you’ll speed through it in the best possible way. The propulsive tale never stops moving, and even in the odd moment it missteps, it continues ever forward. An excellent summer read.

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